Creating conversational communities that drive change

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Planting Awareness / Cultivating Ourselves and our Schools

SEED Leader Peaches Gillette describes how SEED has become a foundational tool for the many diversity initiatives at her school.

Peaches Gillette
The Town School, New York, New York
Essay written 2012

In 1986, when I first came to The Town School, what was then described as diversity work was taking place in one kindergarten classroom among a handful of teachers who collaborated and worked to heighten racial and cultural awareness in their classrooms, with the hope that their work would be embraced and incorporated into the curriculum of the entire nursery division – a total of four classes. The group was informal and it was not recognized as a vital part of the school.

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U.S. Supreme Court. Photo credit: Dana Rudolph

Know Where You Are Going Before Building the Road

Sixty years ago this Saturday, the U.S. Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education struck down racial segregation in schools.Despite that vital step, schools did not then necessarily create environments that gave equal opportunities to all students.

In his essay below, SEED Leader and school administrator Alvin Crawley offers his thoughts on how SEED helped create systemic change in his school district to address the racial achievement gap.

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U.S. Supreme Court. Credit: Dana Rudolph

Interrupting Injustice in the Wake of Brown v. Board of Ed.

This Saturday is the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down racial segregation in schools. That was a vital moment in the history of racial justice, but did not necessarily lead to schools offering a multiculturally equitable education for all students. SEED Leader Bernadette Anand reflects below on how, 20 years after her town's board of education was told to integrate its schools, her English department used SEED to help create "a change from race-separated levels of grouping to a heterogeneously textured World Literature ninth grade course."

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